Django Tech News

Technology news related to Python and Django sourced from around the web.

Bug Fix Released for Django 1.8.6

Author: django-project-official wrote on Nov. 4, 2015, 5:50 p.m.

Today we've issued a bugfix release for the 1.8 release series. Details can be found in the release notes.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.

Source: https://www.djangoproject.com/weblog/2015/nov/04/bugfix-release-issued/

Django 1.9 Beta 1 Released

Author: django-project-official wrote on Oct. 19, 2015, 5:46 p.m.

As part of the Django 1.9 release process, today we've released Django 1.9 beta 1, a preview/testing package that represents the second stage in the 1.9 release cycle and an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 1.9.

Django 1.9 has a myriad of goodies which you can read about in the in-development 1.9 release notes.

Only bugs in new features and regressions from earlier versions of Django will be fixed between now and 1.9 final (also, translations will be updated following the "string freeze" when the release candidate is issued). The current release schedule calls for a release candidate about a month from now with the final release to follow about two weeks after that around December 1. We'll only be able to keep this schedule if we get early and often testing from the community. Updates on the release schedule schedule are available on the django-developers mailing list.

As with all alpha and beta packages, this is not for production use. But if you'd like to take some of the new features for a spin, or to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker), you can grab a copy of the alpha package from our downloads page or on PyPI. As always, signed MD5, SHA1, and SHA256 checksums of the release are available.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.

Source: https://www.djangoproject.com/weblog/2015/oct/19/django-19-beta-1-released/

Django 1.9 Alpha 1 Release Date

Author: django-project-official wrote on Sept. 23, 2015, 5:52 p.m.

As part of the Django 1.9 release process, today we've released Django 1.9 alpha 1, a preview/testing package that represents the first stage in the 1.9 release cycle and an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 1.9.

Django 1.9 has a myriad of goodies which you can read about in the in-development 1.9 release notes.

This alpha milestone marks a complete feature freeze. The current release schedule calls for a beta release in about a month and a release candidate about a month from then. We'll only be able to keep this schedule if we get early and often testing from the community. Updates on the release schedule schedule are available on the django-developers mailing list.

As with all alpha and beta packages, this is not for production use. But if you'd like to take some of the new features for a spin, or to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker), you can grab a copy of the alpha package from our downloads page or on PyPI. As always, signed MD5, SHA1, and SHA256 checksums of the 1.9 alpha package are available.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.

Source: https://www.djangoproject.com/weblog/2015/sep/23/django-19-alpha-1-released/

Happy 10th Birthday, Django!

Author: django-project-official wrote on July 13, 2015, 3:29 p.m.

10 years ago, just before lunch on July 13, 2005, Jacob Kaplan-Moss made the first commit to the public repository that would become Django. This was followed by a series of commits by Adrian Holovaty importing from the private repository where Django had lived up to that point.

I don't think anyone could have predicted what would happen in the 10 years that followed that commit. The project has grown from a handful of developers working in Lawrence, Kansas, to an international team of contributors. The leadership team has moved from 2 BDFLs to a large group, with elected leaders. We've established the not-for-profit Django Software Foundation to steward the future of the framework, and to raise funds. Those funds have been used to help the community grow, and to pay the salary of a Django Fellow to keep on top of contributions.

There are three dedicated DjangoCon conferences (in the US, Europe and Australia) held around the world every year, and countless Django-focussed user groups and smaller events all over the world. These events attract hundreds of attendees. There is also strong Django presence at PyCons and other Python meetups.

The community has also become a leader in social change. We've adopted a Code of Conduct and a Diversity policy to address issues of harassment and diversity in our community. These policies are now being adopted by many other projects, often using Django's policies as a template. These policies are also backed up by actions - events like DjangoGirls directly address issues of diversity in our community.

And, of course, Django continues to be the very best web framework choice for Perfectionists with Deadlines.

Only a fool would try to predict what the next 10 years will hold. The web of 2005 is very different to the web of 2015; we can only imagine what the web of 2025 will look like. But I have no doubt that whatever the outcome, Django will still be there, helping developers turn their dreams into a digital reality.

Happy 10th birthday, Django!

Source: https://www.djangoproject.com/weblog/2015/jul/13/happy-10th-birthday-django/